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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 12:07 pm 
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I've had no spare wheel since I converted about 4 and a half years back. Never had a problem with breakdown cover or MOT.

I was originally with National Breakdown and got them to confirm by email that carrying no spare was fine as long as I had the repair foam can.

The last two years I have been with Start Recovery. They also confirmed to me that having no spare was no problem as long as foam can was available in the car.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2014 10:34 pm 
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Surely you could just not tell them you have no spare wheel? I mean it would only ever come up if you suffer a blowout that isn't repairable with the tyre foam. Which has to be pretty unlikely?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 7:37 pm 
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Interesting update on this subject. Missus phoned me at work today to say she'd hit a pothole and the front tyre on her car was flat. Told her that as I was nearly 100 miles away and she has AA cover to phone them. She calls me back a few minutes later to say that she'd called them to be told that as she didn't have a spare wheel, they would have to charge her. Told her that if she lifted the handle in the boot floor, she would find that she does indeed have a spare wheel so to call them back. Now if she had been driving my spare Range Rover, she wouldn't have had a spare wheel so then what? The AA would source an 18" alloy and tyre? Mind you, had she been driving the Range Rover it would probably have just driven over the pothole without any damage anyway.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:11 pm 
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In that case you normally just pay for the new even, probably at a slightly inflated price :lol:

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 10:01 pm 
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Problem in this case was that the tyre was flat because she's bent the rim and it needs a new wheel..... I suspect the AA wouldn't be into scouring the scrapyards for a wheel for a 1994 Vauxhall Tigra.....

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 2:30 pm 
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A customer told me how when he had a puncture and the AA turned up, they told him that they couldn't move his vehicle as he didn't have a spare wheel. He showed them his can of Tyreweld and they said 'Ahh that's OK then, now we can move your car'. They didn't bother trying to use the Tyreweld, simply winched his car onto the back of the transporter... That's a bit like refusing transport unless the motorist is wearing black socks :lol:

classicswede wrote:
In that case you normally just pay for the new even, probably at a slightly inflated price :lol:

Inflated price to a rounded figure? :lol:

Simon
www.Lpgc.co.uk

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 5:33 pm 
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Location: North Essex
I've always carried the spare wheel in the rear seat with a seat belt tightened (since when were all people the same shape - mostly vast in my neck of the woods!) when touring in France as I'm unsure of the law but I certainly I wouldn't want to be in a situation on one of those fast roads where I get stuck for a day for the want of a replacement tyre. Also carry the goo injector. Not sure of law in Europe on spare wheels but you can bet your life that the Gendarmes are going to give you an on the spot fine if you don't have a spare irrespective of trying to explain their rules.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:47 pm 
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The AA got me home after i hit a kerb and puncured the side wall of my tyre. I'd left the spare at home as i had been carting stuff around the preceding few weeks, and with a side wall puncture sealant was going to be useless. They actually didnt have a flat bed to take the car the 90 miles to stranraer (i was in Dumfries, hardly the back of beyond!), so one of their subcontractors brought out an Astra for me to drive back home and then delivered my own car to me the following morning. They might take an age to get to you, but the 3 times i've used the AA theyve been sound.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 05, 2015 12:44 pm 
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These days when so many new cars are sold without a spare wheel of any description (not even the highly illegal space saver wheels) but just a can of tyre-goo and a 12v "compressor" that has a wildly optimistic 260psi gauge fitted (maybe not all but certainly those i've seen) and are usually of such poor quality that i would question whether they would actually inflate the first tyre they were used on, why do so many breakdown/recovery companies have this stipulation?
My thoughts are that they do this so they can charge the victim extra for towing them home. Maybe i'm right, maybe i'm wrong but it's a possibility, especially when a lot of breakdown/recovery policies are simply extensions of the normal road risk insurance.

With the dedicated breakdown services (AA and RAC) who sell their own policies, employ their own technicians/mechanics/recovery drivers, have their own vehicles etc it appears they don't have this stipulation which adds weight to my suggestion that the others (largely based on an extension of normal car insurance) have it simply to make more money.

It's difficult to see where Green Flag and similar fit in to this set up as they seem to be an independent entity that sell the breakdown/recovery policies and then use sub-contract recovery firms to provide the roadside assistance. However i don't think i saw any mention of them having this in their Ts & Cs in this thread so maybe they don't.

Running a small fleet of "modern classics" (my newest will be 21 next year) getting any sort of breakdown cover can be difficult. However as someone else mentioned, you can get "Personal Cover" from the RAC that covers the person, not the car, even as a passenger and that's the way i've gone. I've not studied the policy book but can't recall seeing anything about spare wheels etc and to be honest, what use is a spare wheel if the cam belt snaps or the distributor breaks or whatever?

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 2:35 am 
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I have 'personal' RAC cover through my Barclays bank account.

When my son wrote his Corsa off I considered calling mates at local garages but thought they'd be displeased with a 230am wake up call so called RAC '"Did you crash car", "No", "Well, we can come out but there'll be an £80 or so fee, but maybe far higher if car won't drive to back of recovery vehicle". So I thought not too bad and agreed, pushed car back onto it's wheels and drove it with broken suspension and flat tyres to back of recovery vehicle! :lol: Write up here http://www.lpgforum.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=13499&start=0&hilit=corsa

What continues to nark me is I filled in forms for recovery man including my phone number, and since then I get maybe 10 calls a week from personal injury claims companies - Either RAC or their recovery man/firm passed my phone number to a database that such companies use to hassle people. Average since the incident will be around 10 a week, peaks have been dozens per week and it can frustrating when you have to break off work to answer phone only to be hassled.. I keep meaning to bring this up with RAC but haven't got around to it so far. Bit of advice though, don't give your number to recovery man! My opinion of RAC has gone downhill due to their (or their contractors) dodgy work ethics.

I don't agree with your point on recovery firms hoping to make money from people with flat tyres, AA, RAC etc are usually paid a premium regardless of whether they attend a broken down vehicle or not, they'd rather not have to come out? Even cheapo 12V compressors do work for a while, will blow up many flat tyres to 40psi etc? Just don't do the woman thing and attempt to blow up air beds / dinghies with them, they're designed for low volume with pressure not vice/versa and get hot after 5 mins use. I've had a few basic ones and they really will do very high pressures, risking getting hotter even more quickly, but more risk of getting involved doing something else and blowing tyre off...? Current one is basic and works, next one will be 'digital' with pressure cut off for the extra £fiver Or maybe I'll fix the big compressor :lol:

Recovery firms may stipulate you must have compressor if no spare because it makes it less likely they will have to attend? Even with Tyreweld a pump is still necessary to inflate tyre after using?

But yes, I agree with much of the rest of what you say,

Simon

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 10:33 pm 
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LPGC wrote:

I don't agree with your point on recovery firms hoping to make money from people with flat tyres, AA, RAC etc are usually paid a premium regardless of whether they attend a broken down vehicle or not, they'd rather not have to come out? Even cheapo 12V compressors do work for a while, will blow up many flat tyres to 40psi etc? Just don't do the woman thing and attempt to blow up air beds / dinghies with them, they're designed for low volume with pressure not vice/versa and get hot after 5 mins use. I've had a few basic ones and they really will do very high pressures, risking getting hotter even more quickly, but more risk of getting involved doing something else and blowing tyre off...? Current one is basic and works, next one will be 'digital' with pressure cut off for the extra £fiver Or maybe I'll fix the big compressor :lol:



Simon


I was referring more to the insurance policy based breakdown cover charging extra, rather than the RAC/AA for punctures/flat tyres if there is no spare present. They both operate their own fleets of vehicles and staff which has to be paid for regardless of whether it's working or not. Towing a vehicle to a destination with a flat tyre clears the job so is in essence a "First Time Fix" which boosts their figures.
Not so with the insurance policy based cover as they have negotiated deals for certain services and generally tyres including punctures are out of this agreement, or at least have been on all the ones i looked at a few years back when i decided getting breakdown cover was a necessity and not a luxury. This was one of the deciding factors for me when i chose the RAC for my cover.

As for the cheapie 12V compressors, yes some of them are pretty good these days but a lot of the units i've seen supplied by a car manufacturer have failed, usually at the worst moment. For example, a neighbour had an 05 plate Volvo XC70 which came with goo and a compressor. He would use this to check/adjust his tyre pressures periodically which was fine until he had a slow puncture. Then he was using it every 2-3 days on that one tyre and it lasted about a week and a half.

Admittedly i have one in my "Get me out of the sh!t kit" which is a 24" toolbox filled with a small and basic 1/4" drive socket set, a similar 1/2" drive set, a screwdriver set including the 1/4" hex drive version and a shed load of various bits, hammer, screwdriver and plier set, adjustable spanners etc all bought in a sale from Screwfix so total cost was about £60. I've also managed to squeeze a 2T bottle jack and a cheapie 12V compressor in there as well as a few other odds and ends that might be useful.
So far i've only used the 12v compressor to test it but even then it made a few odd noises so i reckon one use in anger and it will be FUBAR.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 8:21 pm 
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Location: Milton Keynes
LairdScooby wrote:
LPGC wrote:

I don't agree with your point on recovery firms hoping to make money from people with flat tyres, AA, RAC etc are usually paid a premium regardless of whether they attend a broken down vehicle or not, they'd rather not have to come out? Even cheapo 12V compressors do work for a while, will blow up many flat tyres to 40psi etc? Just don't do the woman thing and attempt to blow up air beds / dinghies with them, they're designed for low volume with pressure not vice/versa and get hot after 5 mins use. I've had a few basic ones and they really will do very high pressures, risking getting hotter even more quickly, but more risk of getting involved doing something else and blowing tyre off...? Current one is basic and works, next one will be 'digital' with pressure cut off for the extra £fiver Or maybe I'll fix the big compressor :lol:



Simon


I was referring more to the insurance policy based breakdown cover charging extra, rather than the RAC/AA for punctures/flat tyres if there is no spare present. They both operate their own fleets of vehicles and staff which has to be paid for regardless of whether it's working or not. Towing a vehicle to a destination with a flat tyre clears the job so is in essence a "First Time Fix" which boosts their figures.
Not so with the insurance policy based cover as they have negotiated deals for certain services and generally tyres including punctures are out of this agreement, or at least have been on all the ones i looked at a few years back when i decided getting breakdown cover was a necessity and not a luxury. This was one of the deciding factors for me when i chose the RAC for my cover.

As for the cheapie 12V compressors, yes some of them are pretty good these days but a lot of the units i've seen supplied by a car manufacturer have failed, usually at the worst moment. For example, a neighbour had an 05 plate Volvo XC70 which came with goo and a compressor. He would use this to check/adjust his tyre pressures periodically which was fine until he had a slow puncture. Then he was using it every 2-3 days on that one tyre and it lasted about a week and a half.

Admittedly i have one in my "Get me out of the sh!t kit" which is a 24" toolbox filled with a small and basic 1/4" drive socket set, a similar 1/2" drive set, a screwdriver set including the 1/4" hex drive version and a shed load of various bits, hammer, screwdriver and plier set, adjustable spanners etc all bought in a sale from Screwfix so total cost was about £60. I've also managed to squeeze a 2T bottle jack and a cheapie 12V compressor in there as well as a few other odds and ends that might be useful.
So far i've only used the 12v compressor to test it but even then it made a few odd noises so i reckon one use in anger and it will be FUBAR.



TBH at the end of it wouldn't you rather spend 20 minutes changing an unusable tyre than waiting hours for the recovery truck to turn up? I've got one of the tyre inflaters in each car, one of them is a draper one thats over 10 years old and works no problem at all. One of them hasn't been used as yet, and the other has been used a few times and smells of burning when used for a couple of minutes! So some are decent, but the cheap ones seem to be what you'd expect (Also discovered the gauge on the cheap digital one over reads by a few psi, so its pretty useless really!)

RAC are slow to turn up, but have got me home on a few occasions, last couple of times i would have needed to call them I managed not to need to (one was a burst coolant hose less than 5 miles from home, so managed to get a mate to tow it back home as we couldn't find where the steam was coming from in the dark the roadside - was split so as it was spraying the exhaust manifold hence the cloud of steam behind me, the other was an alternator that decided it didn't want to produce electricity anymore - This could have been tricky as I was in the middle of Belfast at the time and none of the factors i could find actually had one in the country!, ended up finding a auto electrician and got replacement the next day in time for the ferry back home!).

RAC do use a large number of contractors in the recovery side of things - the technicians that turn up in the RAC vans are their own staff, but if they can't fix it your usually passed onto the contractors for longer distance recovery from what I've found.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 8:51 pm 
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LairdScooby wrote:
Towing a vehicle to a destination with a flat tyre clears the job so is in essence a "First Time Fix" which boosts their figures.
Something I hadn't considered!
Brian_H wrote:
TBH at the end of it wouldn't you rather spend 20 minutes changing an unusable tyre than waiting hours for the recovery truck to turn up?
Definitely would! But got to weigh it all up - Depending on severity of puncture and where and when it happened, I might prefer to stop on a journey a few times to put some more air in using cheapo compressor until getting the tyre repaired properly (picture scene on rainy night muddy roadside changing wheels, compare to stopping a few times on journey to connect pump and sit in warm dry car) / My GV boot is fairly big but not very long, I wouldn't want to carry a spare at expense of load area / Haven't had a bad puncture for several years so in all that time haven't regretted not carrying a spare.. (of course it could happen tomorrow) / Slow punctures more likely than fast punctures.

Simon

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2015 7:55 am 
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Location: South end of North Yorkshire
I use AutoAid - they don't have any recovery vehicles of their own, but call out a local independent near to you. You pay upfront with a debit or credit card, then you send the receipt in and get reimbursed. It's something like £40 a year for cover, and that's cover for you and spouse in any vehicle.
The big advantage over the likes of the AA, RAC etc is that local recovery companies firstly know the area and where you have broken down so get to you extremely quickly, and secondly are far more likely to try to repair or get you moving without rigid national restrictions. They also know the best garages in the area so if you need recovering to somewhere for repairs, they'll usually know which is most appropriate for your make of vehicle.

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