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PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2015 3:23 pm 
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I bought a 2011 Subaru outback 6 weeks ago and had Lpg conversion 2 weeks ago. As the thread title suggests, I am delighted with Lpg and when filling up for less than £30 my smile was from ear to ear ( was £85 to fill previous car). Outback so far is costing 10p/mile!!, and runs smooth as silk. Simply can't understand why there aren't more Lpg cars on the road.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2015 5:38 pm 
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I feel a bit like that too - I've always had big thirsty cars. I put 30K on my 4.7 Jeep on petrol - I don't even want to calculate how much that has cost.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2015 6:41 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2014 1:48 pm
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Location: South end of North Yorkshire
I'm enjoying running my 3.0 litre Subaru Outback on LPG too - all the fun of the flat six 250bhp petrol engine, but it's costing less in fuel than most diesels :)

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2004 Subaru Outback 3.0Rn auto (LPG)
1991 Mitsubishi Pajero 2.5 LWB (WVO)
2008 Volkswagen Caravelle (Diesel)


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 06, 2015 10:22 am 
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Mine is the 2.5 n/a so not that quick but sooooo smooth with the cvt. They are apparently a very easy conversion as well. Early days and have to go back for 1k mile check but am looking forward to cheap motoring for a few years.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 06, 2015 1:57 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 9:42 pm
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Location: Rotherham, South Yorkshire (civilisation)
There's a lot of misinformation floating around 'out there'. Most of it comes from people who have heard horror stories - often apocryphal - about DIY conversions that have gone wrong resulting in the total immolation of the vehicle involved along with the occupants. To put the bitter, inedible cherry on the moldy icing on the dried out cake many 'pundits' claim the tax advantage won't last. They've been saying that since the 80's. One day they might be right, but at 64 I doubt it will be in my lifetime!

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2015 9:54 pm 
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There is always that element of the it doesn't work crowd , or those who have been burnt with a crappy conversion making the far bigger noise.

Most of us who have managed to get it right first time, well it just works, what's to talk about really except is saves a tonne of money, the occasional talk of up keep, filters, maybe spark plugs, and the best part you don't have top resort to diesel. :)

It's quite standard mundane and boring to many of us.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 12:34 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 8:57 am
Posts: 275
Aye, I too am one of the converted.

The quite simple question to myself is why i never did it sooner. But there is little information out there for conversions really. This forum and lets face it not much else.

In the end I just went for it. Bought a kit and got through it.

Once you realise its not that complex. The kits are safe as long as you aren't a complete idiot. An the setup and tuning of the system isn't really too complex there isn't that much else to talk about.

It works, It goes it stops.
Mine is far from a professional install and there are bits I would change but it still does its job faultlessly.

Happy people tend not to shout as loud as others.

I've been telling the Alfa community to go for it. Also looking for a 6 cylinder car so I can have the Alfa Busso soundtrack with diesel running costs.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 6:18 pm 
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Friends and family have liked the new car but give puzzled looks when I tell them it runs on Lpg.!! Most people just don't seem to be interested, but a little research really does make it a no brainer, but maybe it's better if it stays uncommon, as I'm sure any major increase in popularity would bring increased taxation!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 8:56 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 9:42 pm
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Location: Rotherham, South Yorkshire (civilisation)
I can see the lack of attraction even though I've had 3 cars converted. You have to have faith in someone doing something ...odd to your car that he claims will halve your fuel costs (yeah, right, pull the other one). He has your car for 3-4 days while he waves his magic spanners over it (izzy wizzy, let's get bizzy). You will likely lose some luggage space and/or the ability to keep a spare wheel in the car. If your car is new your warranty goes out of the window. It must be a modification that will increase your insurance premiums. Gas? That's explosive, isn't it? Have you seen the number of gas powered cars blowing up on You Tube?

You can point out the fallacies until you're blue in the face, but some prejudices stick long after they are no longer valid.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 2:33 pm 
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I sort of fell into it by accident just over 10 years ago. A mate had a Jag on LPG so I was vaguely familiar with it but that was about all. I was running my Maserati BiTurbo Spider as an everyday car and decided I could really do with something a little more practical and a bit cheaper to run. So the hunt of eBay started. I've always been into the more quirky type of cars and I found a Saab 900, needing an exhaust and a battery for the MoT (well, it didn't need a battery for the MoT but it would have made life a lot easier) and fitted with a non-functioning LPG system. I bought it unseen for £175, bunged a spare battery in the boot of my daughters car and we went to Norwich to collect it. Put the battery on, started it up, noted that it was only the back box on the exhaust that needed replacing and drove it home. My local scrappie had a 900 in so I had the back box from that for a fiver and it went straight through the MoT. Then it was time to look into the LPG system. I didn't know it at the time but after posting the odd picture on here was told, by Rossko, that I had a Leonardo system. The level LEDs showed it to be 3/4 full but as soon as I switched over to gas, the engine died. Talking to my mate with the Jag, he informed me that you never can believe what the gauge tells you, so I bunged a fivers worth of gas in it. Flicked the switch and it didn't die, it carried on running, a result! Being someone that can't put his faith in anything unless I know exactly how it works, I then started the learning curve on LPG systems. I never did get the gauge to read correctly, I just used the trip meter, but that car took me to Minsk and back twice, a round trip of almost 3,000 miles, and cost less than half the air fare. I was sold on LPG.

A couple of years later I had need for something capable of towing a car transporter trailer fairly regularly and a mate of a mate (the same guy with the LPG'd Jag in fact) had a 4.2 Range Rover Classic LSE with a Lovato single point system on it, so I bought that. It ran like a dog, the vaporiser would ice up within 400 yards of setting off on a cold morning and it would go all sick and flat at anything over a third throttle. By then I had a pretty good idea of what the problems were and what needed doing so I pulled the system off, replumbed the coolant hoses, replaced the vaporiser with an R90E and it pulled like a train. I still have need to tow big heavy trailers every so often, detest diesels so something with a big petrol engine running on LPG suits me down to the ground. In fact, the guy that I bought the LSE from wanted to buy it back once I'd sorted it. He'd replaced it with a 2.5 diesel P38 Range Rover but, although his missus loved it as it had a heater, the electric windows worked and all the other insignificant things that didn't work on the LSE did, he hated it. The LSE would do around 14 mpg on LPG so giving a running cost equivalent of 28 mpg. The diesel P38 is widely accepted as being gutless so after being used to the 4.2 litre V8 in the LSE, he would thrash it mercilessly in an effort to get it to go and it was only doing 25 mpg. So not only was it slower, it cost him more to run!

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'96 Saab 900XS, AEB Leo, sold
'93 Range Rover 4.2 LSE, Lovato LovEco, sold
'98 Ex-Police Range Rover 4.0, Singlepoint AEB Leo, my daily motor
'97 Range Rover 4.0SE, eGas multipoint, a project.....

Proud to be a member of the YCHJCYA2PDTHFH club.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 9:50 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2010 5:01 pm
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Location: Yorkshire
When I was 21 I was towing a caravan on the M5 en-route to Newquay from Yorkshire with my later to be ex wife, my mate and his later to be ex wife, this was in my first Granada 2.8I Ghia X, 1982 model, 3am, August in 1991. Car had a leaky petrol tank over about 1/2 full, so I was pushing my luck on range between refueling (so as not to waste money by way of fuel leakage). I ran out of petrol a few miles from the next services (**** head I know, and was told so anyway by mate and his bird, whom I had rudely caused to wake up by having the car stop). But then I thought... Well, actually, I haven't run out of fuel at all, because there are two full bottles of gas in the front of the caravan, forkilifts can run on that stuff and there is nothing special about forklift engines, I just need a way of metering that stuff to the engine. I thought, if I get it to run, and can drop it in gear, and get it to keep running, then I'll just keep at full throttle and be able to control speed on the brakes as far as to the services.. So I hammered the bottle fitting off one of the caravan regulators and attached the caravan gas pipe between that broken fitting and the engine air intake, my mate holding caravan bottle in front passenger seat... Was jubilated to get the engine running, but I couldn't get it to run well and definitely not well enough to have confidence in making it 100 yards never mind to the services! I only experimented for 10 mins or so, me and mate trying to pulse the gas tank shutoff knob, trying to kink the pipe..

We ended up walking to the breakdown phone on the eerie motorway, seemingly in the middle of nowhere, with a new appreciation for the comforts of cars and distances they can cover etc... Beams of light shone down from above... Not UFO's but hot air balloons using motorway signs for navigation, still starting a talk on UFOs between me and mate. 1991, Cost me £50 for a gallon of fuel from the breakdown guy who attended, and he wanted to go through the motions of checking sparks etc.. 'Don't bother with the motions mate, I've run out of fuel - Just put the ******* fuel in will you pal, thanks!". But my car running on gas... After the holiday I told my dad about that. I held the thought but didn't do much about it until I started seeing LPG pumps on forecourts, and then dad bought a factory LPG car. There were problems with his factory system and the only Vauxhall garage in the country, apparently, that knew anything about the LPG systems was Sheffield main dealer, and they were **** - They had his car 2 weeks and then it ran for only a few miles before refusing to run on LPG, but I sorted it. I had a 3L Senator and a 2.5 diesel Scorpio. I liked driving the Senator much more but the Scorpio ran on cherries so was much cheaper to run. Running petrol engines on gas sprung to mind again, after all my dads car ran the same on LPG as on petrol. I searched the net for LPG vehicles, at first having the intention of at least pricing up a second hand factory converted LPG car, but found FES Autogas site and discovered it was possible to convert any petrol car. I converted my Senator, later turbo'd it and it still ran on gas while touching on Lotus Carlton performance. Then I started converting cars for customers and have been doing so ever since.

One of the early vehicles I converted was a V5 (engine configuration seemed weird to me then and in a way still does!) VW. I had probs converting that car - At one point I went to work on it and didn't come out of the garage, at all, for 3 days and nights except to go to the toilet, bacon sarnies and soup delivered, dad helping me and neither of us would be the first to chuck the towel in and go to bed! Took me (us) 5 days in total but that was what I'd consider my first fairly techy install and was very successful. These days I wouldn't need to go to such extremes!

Simon

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2 miles A1, 8 miles M62,
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 5:03 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 15, 2013 4:09 pm
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Well, had the Outback mot'd today. Lowering emissions was not my main concern when going for a LPG conversion but I am impressed with the emissions readout! CO2 of 0.004% and hydrocarbon reading 0!! Passed with no advisories too!!


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 9:28 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2015 12:45 am
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Like everyone else that has commented here, i wonder why i didn't do it sooner! For many years i've been considering it and then thinking "Nah, it's not worth it, the payback time will be too long2 and other similar excuses.

Then i bought my Jeep last year. Even with the intrinsic thirst of an agricultural 4.0L auto in a vehicle weighing nearly 2T with the aerodynamics of a breeze-block, side-on, it was still cheaper to bring home than my mates 1.8 "modern" running on petrol!
Even after that first trip i was totally sold on LPG.

Now i'm slowly but surely amassing the bits to convert my Rover 827s and learning all the while. Looking forward to running about at 30+mpg on fuel costing <50p/Litre now!

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Dave


Somewhere in Suffolk with a Jeep, 2 Rovers and a V6 Volvo

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